Category Archives: Uncategorized

Smart Contact Lenses: Where Science Fiction Meets Modern Medicine

Smart Contact Lenses

In his famous 1970’s science fiction TV show, the Six Million Dollar Man sported many fanciful technological enhancements, including a bionic eye that worked like a telephoto lens. At the time, that type of “upgrade” to our natural human sight abilities seemed a little absurd.

However, medical science today is catching up with science fiction as several companies are developing so-called “smart” contact lenses for a variety of practical, as well as entertainment uses.

Today’s post offers a little look into where the future of contact lenses may be headed. Continue Reading Smart Contact Lenses: Where Science Fiction Meets Modern Medicine

The Truth About Eye Exercises

Have you seen online ads promising that you’ll be able to throw out your glasses if you pay for a “medically proven” eye exercise program? Don’t fall for the sales pitch.

While there are legitimately helpful vision therapy programs that your optometrist or ophthalmologist may prescribe to help correct particular issues—especially for children—self-help eye exercises are not the same thing at all. And you need to be wary of the claims made by the marketers of these programs.

Unfortunately, at worst, eye exercises can actually harm your eye health or vision by causing strain or injury. Also dangerous, though, is people believing they do not need routine vision care because they’ve subscribed to a self-help program.

Today’s post explores a few questions that our patients often have about eye exercise programs they’ve seen advertised, as well as how these compare to vision therapy supervised by an eye care professional. We’ll also take a look at some simple things you can do to keep your eyes healthy over time—no eye exercises required. Continue Reading The Truth About Eye Exercises

A Brief Guide to Children’s Eye Care

Child with glasses

With Children’s Eye Health/Safety Month coming up in August, we wanted to take a moment to discuss eye care needs for kids.

It’s true that 5 to 10 percent of preschoolers and 25 percent of school-aged children have vision problems, which can lead to a host of other developmental and behavioral issues if not identified and corrected. These can include:

Continue Reading A Brief Guide to Children’s Eye Care

What Everyone Should Know About Eye Pressure

When giving an annual eye exam, ophthalmologists check many aspects of vision and eye health, including intraocular eye pressure. Eye doctors measure eye pressure because elevated pressure—aka ocular hypertension—can damage the optic nerve and cause permanent vision loss.

There are several methods for testing eye pressure; each is a form of tonometry. Tonometry tools and techniques vary. The most well known may be the one involving a puff of air being blown at the eye, called non-contact or air-puff tonometry.

No matter which tool an ophthalmologist uses, the important thing is that they measure eye pressure.

Continue Reading What Everyone Should Know About Eye Pressure

Six Big Things Contact Wearers Want to Know

Contact lenses have been around since 1887, when they were made of glass. Luckily, contact lenses have evolved a lot since then. Modern lenses are safer, more comfortable, and better at correcting a variety of vision challenges.

Today, contact lenses can be made from different materials, and which ones are best for the wearer depends upon the vision challenges to be corrected. This post focuses on what patients considering contacts for the first time need to know.

Continue Reading Six Big Things Contact Wearers Want to Know

What You Need to Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Did you know that macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss among Americans over age 50? Today, cases of this progressive eye disease that are related to aging number about 9 million, but with the rapidly maturing population in the United States, research suggests that number will balloon to 17.8 million cases by 2050.

The good news is, with patient education and promotion of routine eye care to more adults, we can potentially reduce that number, or at least prevent natural macular degeneration from progressing to blindness for more people.

Continue Reading What You Need to Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration

A Concise Guide to Glaucoma

With World Glaucoma Week just wrapping up a little earlier this March, we wanted to keep the awareness-building going in our latest post here on the blog.

Glaucoma is sometimes called the “silent blinding disease” because early symptoms are often unnoticeable, and without comprehensive routine vision care, many individuals do not know they have it until after potentially irreversible vision damage has occurred.

There are also multiple types of glaucoma, some of which are related to other eyesight disorders and diseases (known as “secondary” glaucoma. “Primary” glaucoma develops unrelated to other conditions). These facts make it clear that glaucoma is still not a widely enough recognized disease even though the World Health Organization estimates that about 12% of all blindness globally is caused by glaucoma.

Continue Reading A Concise Guide to Glaucoma

What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can cause a host of vision-related complications for patients, especially if blood sugar is not well controlled. As we introduced in a previous post here on the blog, the most common of these diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy—up to 45% of Americans with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to significant vision loss or blindness over time.

While these facts may paint a gloomy picture, the good news is that diabetic retinopathy can be treated and even prevented with routine vision care, which includes a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once per year. Today’s post offers a closer look at what diabetic retinopathy is and how our caring vision experts at Campus Eye Center can help you manage and treat all varieties of diabetic eye disease.

Continue Reading What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

What Cataracts Are and How You Can Prevent Them

As we age, our eyes go through a number of natural changes. Some of these changes – namely the development of cataracts – unfortunately cause vision loss. In fact, cataracts are the number one cause of vision loss in people over age 40, according to vision insurer VSP.

The good news is that there are lots of things you can do to prevent cataracts from forming or slow their progression.

If you do happen to be suffering from cataract symptoms today, however, a simple surgical procedure can often restore your clear vision. Today’s blog post will share more about how Campus Eye Center can help with all of your eye health concerns, including diagnosing and correcting cataracts.

Continue Reading What Cataracts Are and How You Can Prevent Them

What about children’s eye care?

As a parent, you may wonder whether your preschooler has a vision problem or when you should schedule your child’s first eye exam.

Eye exams for children are extremely important, because 5 to 10 percent of preschoolers and 25 percent of school-aged children have vision problems. The most common eye disorders found in children are refractive error (the need for glasses), amblyopia (lazy eye), and strabismus (eye turn). Early identification of a child’s vision problem can be crucial because children often are more responsive to treatment when problems are diagnosed early and if left untreated, some childhood vision problems can cause permanent vision loss.

Continue Reading What about children’s eye care?