What You Need to Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Did you know that macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss among Americans over age 50? Today, cases of this progressive eye disease that are related to aging number about 9 million, but with the rapidly maturing population in the United States, research suggests that number will balloon to 17.8 million cases by 2050.

The good news is, with patient education and promotion of routine eye care to more adults, we can potentially reduce that number, or at least prevent natural macular degeneration from progressing to blindness for more people. Continue Reading What You Need to Know About Age-Related Macular Degeneration

A Concise Guide to Glaucoma

With World Glaucoma Week just wrapping up a little earlier this March, we wanted to keep the awareness-building going in our latest post here on the blog.

Glaucoma is sometimes called the “silent blinding disease” because early symptoms are often unnoticeable, and without comprehensive routine vision care, many individuals do not know they have it until after potentially irreversible vision damage has occurred.

There are also multiple types of glaucoma, some of which are related to other eyesight disorders and diseases (known as “secondary” glaucoma. “Primary” glaucoma develops unrelated to other conditions). These facts make it clear that glaucoma is still not a widely enough recognized disease even though the World Health Organization estimates that about 12% of all blindness globally is caused by glaucoma. Continue Reading A Concise Guide to Glaucoma

What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can cause a host of vision-related complications for patients, especially if blood sugar is not well controlled. As we introduced in a previous post here on the blog, the most common of these diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy—up to 45% of Americans with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to significant vision loss or blindness over time.

While these facts may paint a gloomy picture, the good news is that diabetic retinopathy can be treated and even prevented with routine vision care, which includes a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once per year. Today’s post offers a closer look at what diabetic retinopathy is and how our caring vision experts at Campus Eye Center can help you manage and treat all varieties of diabetic eye disease. Continue Reading What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

What Cataracts Are and How You Can Prevent Them

As we age, our eyes go through a number of natural changes. Some of these changes – namely the development of cataracts – unfortunately cause vision loss. In fact, cataracts are the number one cause of vision loss in people over age 40, according to vision insurer VSP.

The good news is that there are lots of things you can do to prevent cataracts from forming or slow their progression.

If you do happen to be suffering from cataract symptoms today, however, a simple surgical procedure can often restore your clear vision. Today’s blog post will share more about how Campus Eye Center can help with all of your eye health concerns, including diagnosing and correcting cataracts. Continue Reading What Cataracts Are and How You Can Prevent Them

What about children’s eye care?

As a parent, you may wonder whether your preschooler has a vision problem or when you should schedule your child’s first eye exam.

Eye exams for children are extremely important, because 5 to 10 percent of preschoolers and 25 percent of school-aged children have vision problems. The most common eye disorders found in children are refractive error (the need for glasses), amblyopia (lazy eye), and strabismus (eye turn). Early identification of a child’s vision problem can be crucial because children often are more responsive to treatment when problems are diagnosed early and if left untreated, some childhood vision problems can cause permanent vision loss. Continue Reading What about children’s eye care?

What is macular Degeneration?

Welcome!

In this issue:

Mention this newsletter and receive $10 off your Dark Adaptation Test.Kerry T. Givens, M.D. David S. Williams, M.D. Lee A. Klombers, M.D. Olga M. Womer, O.D. Lisa J. Kott, O.D.

What is macular Degeneration? You have heard about it and may know someone who has it; but, what are the risk factors for macular degeneration and are you at risk?

MACULAR DEGENERATION or age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive eye disease and a leading cause of blindness, affecting more than 9 million people in the U.S. alone.  It impacts the macula, an area of the retina where detailed central vision occurs. Numerous clinical studies have shown that dark adaptation – the recovery of vision when going from daylight to darkness – is dramatically impaired from the earliest stages of AMD and increases as the diseases progress. Continue Reading What is macular Degeneration?

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. Continue Reading World Diabetes Day